Skip to main content

Cambridge Castle

Last Thursday (the day after the gig in the previous post), my husband and I drove to Cambridge as we hadn't been there for two years, and because I wanted to check out the motte-and-bailey that'd been first constructed in 1068 by King William I.

 photo DSCF1504_zpsp2gay6td.jpg

After being crowned on Christmas Day 1066, William returned to Normandy with hostages (who included earl Waltheof of Huntingdon and Edgar Aetheling), but by the end of the year (1067) the English were rebelling at Exeter (refusing fealty, to pay taxes), giving William no other choice but to leave Normandy and return to England. After eighteen days, Exeter yielded and Rougemont Castle was thrown up, garrisoned by Normans, but that wasn't the end of his problems.

After Matilda's coronation in Westminster, there was unrest in the North and William wasted no time in travelling northwards - throwing up motte-and-baileys at Warwick and Nottingham on the way (not the current stone castle) - Click, and was quite successful in his suppression as he constructed two castles in York (one of them being called 'Cliffords Tower).

However rebellion fever was in the air, for it was about this time that 'Hereward the Wake' started a rebellion of his own in Ely, and William had no choice but to construct Cambridge castle so as to secure the area.

 photo DSCF1502_zpsmhscxicf.jpg  photo DSCF1497_zpsrdhuq9kb.jpg

It's very similar to other mounds I've been to (Clare, Rayleigh, Bishop's Stortford, Mount Bures.... ), but it's one of my favourites as it's in one of my favourite English cities <3 p="">
outfit -

dress - topshop (£14 in a sale)
blazer - topshop (£18 in a sale)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Berkhamsted Castle

Back in May, we travelled to Hertfordshire to visit Berkhamsted's Norman motte-and-bailey castle.



Originally a motte-and-bailey then, this was thrown up after the battle of Hastings in order to monitor the route from the Midlands to London - serving as a strategic fortification for William I. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, mentions Berkhamsted as the place where the archbishop of York, Edgar aetheling, earl Edwin and earl Morcar, surrendered to William (they probably didn't have any choice):

'He (William) went up with all the army that was left to him, and those who had since come over the sea, and ravaged all the parts he went over, until he came to Berkhamsted. There he was met by archbishop Aldred, child Edgar, eorl Edwin, eorl Morkere and all the best men of London'

So was Berkhamsted castle thrown up before or after the men surrendered? Well, before it was held by Robert of Mortain (William's younger half-brother), Domesday Book reveals that the town was held by Ea…

Colchester Zoo

Pictures from 10/3/2017. Can't beat a good trip to the zoo :) 

And what do you know? - there was even an old church attached to the site! - click!
My fabulous t-shirt is from www.qwertee.com ;)

Cat

We now have a cat, named Bella!



She's absolutely lovely and is settling in well. Best decision we've ever made.

My next post will be about Orford Castle, where we're heading to on Thursday. Hope the weather stays nice!