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From Hell

I recently read a book about Jack the Ripper and found it so enthralling (awakening my 14 year old self) I looked online to see if a tour was available of the East End... and of course, there is one. It runs from 7.30-9.30pm every evening and is only £9; well worth it. I have walked through Whitechapel before (unwittingly knowing so as a child), but never in the evening so this made even more creepy, the boy was with me though, along with 30 other people!

My knowledge of the Ripper subject is fairly good having studied the autumn of 1888 at high school, so I found myself nodding along with the tour guide (ignoring several stupid comments about Sherlock Holmes solving the case) and shivering in my recently purchased Victorian styled jacket.
Millers Court (where Mary Kelly lived and was murdered) has shifted so it was a little strange standing on the second floor of a car-park viewing over the deathly murder scene of the faceless young woman but other than that, it was incredible. The tour began outside at an actual old doss house (4 pence a night, 2 pence to lean on an old rope) and it looks as daunting today as it no doubt did in the gross East End of Victorian London, where in the West, it could not be any more different.
It was too dark to take pictures unfortunately,but if you are interested in the subject, go online and book tickets, you won't regret it! ;)

Earlier on in the day, we visited the British Museum :)

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A medieval chess set
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Taken from St Stephen's chapel at the palace of Westminster (Edward III, a year after the fall at Calais, wished this chapel along with St George's chapel at Windsor, to be reestablished). You can imagine how it must have looked; beautiful. The chapel was apparently founded by King Stephen (1135-1154) and was incomplete disrepair before Edward decided to `spruce it up`
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I did take a few more pictures but because of the cabinets, they haven't come out all too well :-/... of course didn't really want to use the flash! I did see some people doing it and it is quite annoying.
Anyway, please do visit these splendid attractions if you find yourself in London!

Jacket - vintage via ebay (about £5)
Black blouse - Zara via a charity shop (£2.75)
Grey Cardigan - Topshop (£38)
Bag - ebay (£20)
Skirt - Topshop (present)


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My second gig this year, still can't believe it!

The View were awesome!<3 nbsp="" p="">
Earlier on in the day, we attended the British Library's Russian Revolution exhibition - Click, and it was brilliant, very detailed. And you don't even have to be a History Undergraduate like me to take it in/enjoy it :) Beginning with the peasant emancipation and ending with Lenin's death, it's a modern Historian's dream!

We were also very lucky with the weather!

My next post will be about Berkhamsted Castle.